Sunday, September 28, 2014

Bond meets Cephalopod Mollusk: Object? Octogasm!

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "2,500 Movies Challenge" <noreply@blogger.com>
Date: Sep 28, 2014 4:10 PM
Subject: Dave's 2,500 Movies Challenge
To: <trrytrvrs@gmail.com>

Dave's 2,500 Movies Challenge


#1,503. Octopussy (1983)

Posted: 27 Sep 2014 08:30 PM PDT


Directed By: John Glen

Starring: Roger Moore, Maud Adams, Louis Jourdan




Tag line: "Nobody does it better...thirteen times"

Trivia: James Brolin was almost given the role of James Bond when at the last minute, Roger Moore agreed to play Bond again








Comedy was a major component of Roger Moore's 7-film tenure as James Bond, yet no movie during this period featured as much humor as 1983's Octopussy, which relies so heavily on one-liners and witty asides that, at times, it's a real distraction.

Working undercover at a New Delhi circus, secret agent 009 (Andy Bradford), disguised as a clown, manages to steal an exact replica of an invaluable Fabergè egg, which he delivers to the British Embassy just before dying (he was stabbed in the back). With the real egg going up for auction at Sotheby's, MI6 sends its best man, James Bond (Moore), to root out whoever was responsible for the forgery (more than likely, with their copy now gone, this person or persons will want to re-acquire the original). After a brief bidding war, the egg is won by Kamal Khan (Louis Jourdan), who, along with his accomplice Madga (Kristin Wayborn), flies home to India with it. What they don't know is that, during the auction, Bond replaced the real egg with the phony one. With the actual Fabergè in tow, 007 heads to India, where he hopes to discover why Khan is so interested in such a priceless item. What he finds is that Khan, who's somehow linked to an all-female organization led by the mysterious Octopussy (Maud Adams), has been working for General Orlov (Steven Berkoff), a Soviet officer who's raising money to launch an attack against the west, one he's convinced will prove to the world the military might of the Soviet army. With the General's plan already in motion, 007 must move quickly to prevent a catastrophe that, if carried out, will kill thousands of innocent people.

Despite the seriousness of its story (which involves nuclear weapons, a hot topic back in the 1980s), Octopussy is chock full of humor, with Moore's Bond rattling off one-liners at a breakneck pace, and doing so throughout much of the film. While in India, Bond pays a visit to "Q" (Desmond Llewellyn), who's testing his latest invention: a remote controlled Indian rope trick, which, unfortunately, snaps in half before reaching the top. Without missing a beat, Bond quips "Having a hard time keeping it up, Q?" Even the action scenes have their share of jokes (during a street fight with Khan's henchmen, Bond pulls a sword out of a sword swallowers mouth, then tosses one poor guy onto a bed of nails), and some of the humor is downright ridiculous, like when Bond is in the jungle, trying to escape from Khan and his men. Climbing a tree, he grabs hold of a vine and jumps, and as he swings through the air, the Tarzan yell fills the soundtrack!

That's not to say Octopussy is devoid of those elements that make a good Bond picture. For one, the women are gorgeous, especially Wayborn's Madga, who isn't shy about using her body to get what she wants. Louis Jourdan, always a sold actor, does a fine job as this film's villain, as does Berkoff, whose General Orlov is particularly deplorable. Partially shot in Rajasthan, the Indian locale is used to great effect, and series regulars Llewellyn and Lois Maxwell (as Moneypenny) also turn up briefly (Llewellyn's "Q", who gets more screen time than usual, even joins in on the final battle). And while most of the movie features mediocre action, the entire finale, which begins with Bond trying to catch a train and ends with the traditional shoot-out, is absolutely exhilarating.

Unlike some, I don't rank Octopussy among the worst Bond films; its thrilling climax manages to salvage much of the silliness that went before it. But with such a heavy emphasis on humor, it's hard to deny that, at times, Octopussy comes across as one of the series' minor efforts.







You are subscribed to email updates from 2,500 Movies Challenge
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google Inc., 20 West Kinzie, Chicago IL USA 60610

Saturday, September 27, 2014

Bringing up Baby (1939)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "2,500 Movies Challenge" <noreply@blogger.com>
Date: Sep 27, 2014 4:29 PM
Subject: Dave's 2,500 Movies Challenge
To: <trrytrvrs@gmail.com>

Dave's 2,500 Movies Challenge


#1,502. Bringing Up Baby (1938)

Posted: 26 Sep 2014 07:30 PM PDT


Directed By: Howard Hawks

Starring: Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, Charles Ruggles


Tag line: "And so begins the hilarious adventure of Professor David Huxley and Miss Susan Vance, a flutter-brained vixen with love in her heart!"

Trivia: Christopher Reeve based his performance as Clark Kent in Superman (1978) on Cary Grant's performance as David Huxley in this film






Of all the screwball comedies to emerge from the '30s and '40s, Bringing Up Baby, a 1938 film directed by Howard Hawks and starring Cary Grant and Katherine Hepburn, is easily the screwiest (which, in turn, makes it one of the sub-genres funniest entries).

Things are looking up for Dr. David Huxley (Grant), a paleontologist working for a prestigious museum in New York City. For one, he's about to marry his longtime assistant, Alice (Virginia Walker), and on top of that he's just received word from an overseas expedition that they've uncovered a rare intercostal clavicle, the last bone needed to complete the brontosaurus skeleton he's been reconstructing for the past 4 years. What's more, socialite Elizabeth Random (Mary Robson) is looking to donate a million dollars to a worthy organization, and the museum is at the top of her list! To seal the deal, Huxley heads to the local country club to play a round of golf with Ms. Random's lawyer, Alexander Peabody (George Irving). It's here that he has an unfortunate run-in with heiress Susan Vance (Hepburn), and all at once his life is turned upside-down.

After accidentally playing his ball while on the golf course, Ms. Vance then steals (albeit by mistake) Dr. Huxley's car, causing him to take off after her and leave poor Mr. Peabody alone on the links. To try and explain what happened, Huxley makes arrangements to meet Peabody at the club restaurant later that evening, only to once again run into Ms. Vance, resulting in yet another disaster (both Huxley and Ms. Vance end up tearing their clothes and are forced to make a hasty exit). From then on, Dr. Huxley finds he's unable to shake the flighty Ms Vance, who's taken a liking to him, and before he knows it he's in her car, heading to Connecticut to drop off a pet leopard named Baby, which Ms. Huxley's brother sent from Brazil as a gift for their aunt. As crazy as all this seems, it's nothing compared to what happens when the mismatched couple reaches Connecticut!

The cast of Bringing Up Baby is superb. Cary Grant is pitch-perfect as Dr. David Huxley, the once-stable scientist who becomes an unwitting accomplice to Ms. Huxley's flights of fancy, and as a result slowly begins to unravel. Along with Grant's controlled hysterics, Bringing up Baby gives us Katherine Hepburn as you've never seen her before, playing Ms Vance as a ditzy, love struck girl who can't stay out of trouble (While driving to Connecticut with Dr. Huxley and Baby the Leopard, she crashes into a truck hauling chickens and ducks. As the birds flutter around on the road, a hungry Baby licks its lips and jumps out the back of the car. When the smoke clears, several chickens and ducks are missing, leaving Dr. Huxley to pay for the damages). But what really makes Bringing Up Baby an unforgettable experience are the insane situations these two characters get themselves into, some of which amount to petty crimes (after accidentally stealing a purse at the club restaurant, Ms. Huixley purposefully swipes a car on the road to Connecticut). With its fast, overlapping dialogue and frenzied pace, Bringing up Baby is a wild motion picture (what other '30s movie has a fight between a docile leopard and an angry Scottish terrier?)

Featuring stellar performances and enough anarchy to make the Marx Brothers proud, Bringing up Baby is cinematic insanity at its absolute best, a cauldron of craziness that gets loonier with each passing minute. It is also one of the greatest screen comedies ever made.







You are subscribed to email updates from 2,500 Movies Challenge
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google Inc., 20 West Kinzie, Chicago IL USA 60610

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

THE DEPARTED (2006)





Dave's 2,500 Movies Challenge


Posted: 10 Sep 2014 07:00 PM PDT

Directed By: Martin Scorsese

Starring: Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon, Jack Nicholson



Tag line: "Cops or Criminals. When you're facing a loaded gun what's the difference?"

Trivia: Leonardo DiCaprio was cast in the title role in The Good Shepherd (2006), but he dropped out to play Billy Costigan in this movie






On the evening of February 25, 2007, when the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences presented their awards to the previous year's best and brightest, one of the most egregious oversights in their history was finally corrected when Martin Scorsese received the Oscar for Best Director. The fact that the film he won for, 2006's The Departed, was a crime movie seemed fitting, seeing as the great director has, over the years, proven himself one of the finest in that particular genre. And unlike most artists who receive an Oscar late in their career, this was no "pity win" (a la John Wayne's Best Actor nod for 1969's True Grit). The Academy does, on occasion, make mistakes, but in this case, the award went to the right person.

A remake of the 2002 Hong Kong action film Infernal Affairs, The Departed stars Leonardo DiCaprio as Billy Costigan, a detective with the Boston police force who's chosen for a very dangerous assignment: pose as a criminal in order to infiltrate a gang of thieves headed by Frank Costello (Jack Nicholson), perhaps the most lethal crime boss in the entire city. With only two people, Capt. Queenan (Martin Sheen) and Lt. Dignam (Mark Wahlberg), aware of his missiorecein, Costigan goes deep undercover and eventually wins the confidence of both Costello and his second-in-command, Frenchy (Ray Winstone). Soon, he's a trusted member of their gang, but what Costigan and his superiors don't know is Costello has his own man inside the Boston PD: Colin Sullivan (Matt Damon), who, by all appearances, is a solid member of the force (he moves into a posh neighborhood and begins dating Madolyn, a beautiful police therapist played by Vera Farmiga). However, Sullivan works solely for Costello, passing along information and tipping him off on every move the cops make. It isn't long before both organizations realize they have a rat in their midst, putting both Costigan and Sullivan in a very precarious position.

Having directed one of the best crime movies of all-time (Goodfellas) as well as a few others that border on greatness (Mean Streets, Casino, Gangs of New York), Scorsese was the perfect choice to helm The Departed, and was definitely up to the challenge. One of the things that impressed me most about the film was its solid pacing; The Departed flows brilliantly, with its 151 minutes flying by in what seems like half that time. Much of this is thanks to Scorsese's patented style, making excellent use of the quick edits and roaming cameras he's come to rely on over the years, but he also succeeded in drawing out the best his actors had to offer; Nicholson, DiCaprio, Damon, Sheen, Farmiga and Baldwin are all in top form, while Mark Wahlberg has never been better (his turn as the smart-ass Dignam is a definite high point). The violence, though often jarring, has an almost lyrical feel to it, and Scorsese even manages to bring us to the edge of our seats on a few occasions (a chase through the streets at night, with Costigan trying to catch a glimpse of Sullivan's face while remaining hidden himself, is incredibly tense). As he's done countless times in the past, Scorsese even picked the perfect songs to accompany the on-screen action (Pink Floyd's "Comfortably Numb", performed by Van Morrison, adds depth to an intimate scene between Costigan and his therapist, Madolyn, who also happens to be Sullivan's girlfriend). With The Departed, Martin Scorsese was firing on all cylinders, showing once again why he ranks among the finest directors of the past 50 years.

Personally, I think Scorsese should have won at least one Academy Award in each of the last four decades: along with 2006's The Departed, he deserved the Oscar for 1976's Taxi Driver (though the man he lost to, John G. Avildsen, did turn out a classic with Rocky); 1980's Raging Bull (Robert Redford took the Oscar that year for Ordinary People); and 1990's Goodfellas (when he was beaten by Kevin Costner and Dances with Wolves). And I wouldn't count Scorsese out of the current decade, either. As he proved with 2013's The Wolf of Wall Street, he can still "wow" an audience. But even if the Academy again turns its back on him, at least Scorsese won it once.

And for a movie that's every bit as good as some of his best.







You are subscribed to email updates from 2,500 Movies Challenge
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google Inc., 20 West Kinzie, Chicago IL USA 60610

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Fwd: Dave's 2,500 Movies Challenge




Dave's 2,500 Movies Challenge


#1,498. The Thin Man (1934)

Posted: 22 Sep 2014 08:17 PM PDT


Directed By: W.S. Van Dyke

Starring: William Powell, Myrna Loy, Maureen O'Sullivan




Tag line: "A laugh tops every thrilling moment!"

Trivia: Skippy, who played Asta the dog, bit Myrna Loy during filming







Take one murder mystery, add a dash of screwball comedy, and, for flavor, mix in a couple of charming alcoholics and you have 1934's The Thin Man, a hilarious whodunit that keeps you guessing (and laughing) 'til the very end.

Nick Charles (William Powell), a retired private eye who now spends his days in a constant state of inebriation, is vacationing in New York City with his wealthy wife Nora (Myrna Loy) and their faithful dog Asta when he learns that his old friend Clyde Wynant (Edward Ellis) is missing. Soon after, Wynant's former flame, Julia Wolf (Natalie Moorhead), is found murdered in her apartment, with all the evidence suggesting Wynant himself is the killer. Convinced of her father's innocence, Dorothy Wynant (Maureen O'Sullivan) asks Nick to come out of retirement and take the case. Nick agrees, but the deeper he delves into this mystery, the more suspects he uncovers.

William Powell is flawless as the wise-cracking, hard drinking former detective who, even when he's drunk, is usually the smartest guy in the room. After agreeing to work on the case, he tags along with police detective John Guild (Nat Pendleton) to question Joe Morelli (Edward Brophy), one of the last people to see Julia Wolf alive. During the interrogation, Morelli claims to have evidence proving where he was the night of the murder, and walks into a back room to get it. As Guild waits for Morelli to return, Nick picks up a telephone and puts a call in to police headquarters, requesting they follow Morelli to see where he's going. At that point, Guild rushes in to the back room, only to find that Morelli climbed out a window, just as Nick predicted. When not on the case, Nick spends his time hanging around a swanky New York hotel, getting drunk and trading witticisms with his wife Nora, one of the few people who can drink him under the table. Like Powell, Loy is wonderful in the film, and their scenes together are pure gold. Upon meeting Nick at a local bar, Nora asks how many drinks he's had, to which Nick replies "six martinis". So, in order to catch up with him, Nora has the waiter bring her five more martinis, all at once, telling him to line them up in a row on the table in front of her! In addition to the laughs, The Thin Man features a nifty murder mystery, culminating in a final sequence where Nick invites all the suspects to a dinner party, knowing full well that one of them is the killer.

A comedy that doubles as a serious whodunit, The Thin Man is a whole mess of fun crammed into 91 minutes.







You are subscribed to email updates from 2,500 Movies Challenge
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google Inc., 20 West Kinzie, Chicago IL USA 60610

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Arsenic and Old Lace (1944)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "2,500 Movies Challenge" <noreply@blogger.com>
Date: Sep 19, 2014 4:06 PM
Subject: Dave's 2,500 Movies Challenge
To: <trrytrvrs@gmail.com>

Dave's 2,500 Movies Challenge


#1,494. Arsenic and Old Lace (1944)

Posted: 18 Sep 2014 08:55 PM PDT


Directed By: Frank Capra

Starring: Cary Grant, Priscilla Lane, Raymond Massey



Tag line: "She's just discovered his favorite aunts have poisoned their 13th gentleman friend !"

Trivia: Capra actually filmed the movie in 1941 because of star Cary Grant's availability, but it was not released until 1944, after the original stage version had finished its run on Broadway






Arsenic and Old Lace, Frank Capra's 1944 dark comedy, introduces us to a couple of elderly ladies who aren't nearly as sweet as they appear.

Despite having written several books condemning the institution of marriage, drama critic Mortimer Brewster (Cry Grant) secretly weds Elaine Harper (Priscilla Lane), the girl who lives next door to his Aunts Abby (Josephine Hull) and Martha (Jean Adair). While giving his aunts the good news, Mortimer makes a startling discovery in the form of a dead body hidden inside their window seat. Adding to the confusion is the fact his Aunts already know about the deceased, mostly because they're the ones who put him there! To Mortimer's horror, Aunts Abby and Martha are serial killers, murdering elderly men who respond to a classified ad they placed in the paper. Toss into the mix Mortimer's brother, Teddy (John Alexander), who thinks he's Theodore Roosevelt, and his other brother Jonathan (Raymond Massey), a dangerous lunatic who claims to have killed a few himself, and you have a time bomb just waiting to explode.

The Brewsters sure are a crazy bunch, and Capra and company do a fine job bringing their insanity to the big screen (the story is based on a 1939 stage play written by Joseph Kesselring). Cary Grant is in his element as Mortimer, the most sensible of the Brewsters, rattling off lines at a fever pitch as he tries to make sense of all that's going on around him. Along with his penchant for snappy dialogue, Grant also proves himself a master of physical comedy, contorting his face and gesturing wildly with each new development (late in the film, Mortimer finds himself gagged and tied to a chair, yet even here Grant manages to make us chuckle with his exasperated facial expressions). As for the rest of the brood, they're quite a collection of characters. John Alexander gets his share of laughs as Teddy, the brother who's convinced he's Theodore Roosevelt. Shouting "Charge!" whenever he runs up the stairs (as if he was storming San Juan Hill), Teddy also annoys the neighbors whenever he blows his bugle in the middle of the night (which usually brings the police running). At first glance, Mortimer's two aunts, Abby and Martha, are kindly old gals, serving tea to the local minister (Grant Mitchell) and donating toys for the area's underprivileged children. Their pleasant nature never wavers, not even when discussing the 12 murders they've committed. As far as Abby and Martha are concerned, there's no reason to be ashamed of what they've done. All of their victims were old and alone, with no family to look after them. Using a blend of poisons ("I take one teaspoon full of arsenic, then add half a teaspoon full of strychnine, and then just a pinch of cyanide", Martha tells a befuddled Mortimer), they send the gentlemen to the great beyond, then have Teddy dig a grave in the basement (convincing him he's working on the Panama Canal) and hold a service to lay the deceased to rest.

In spite of their sometimes alarming behavior, Teddy and the two aunts come across as likable characters, and we laugh at their hijinks. The same cannot be said for Jonathan, Mortimer's long lost brother who abruptly returns home with a new face (many comment that he looks like Boris Karloff, something of an in-joke seeing as, in the stage production, the character was actually played by Karloff) and a nervous companion, Dr. Einstein, superbly portrayed by the great Peter Lorre. An obvious psychotic, Jonathan talks of the men he's killed (when he discovers his Aunts murdered 12 men, Jonathan fires back that he's taken out 13. "You can't count the one in South Bend", Dr. Einstein says to Jonathan, "He died of pneumonia". But as Jonathan proudly points out, "He wouldn't have died of pneumonia if I hadn't shot him!"). With his icy demeanor and determined gaze, Massey brings a real menace to the character, making him the lone Brewster we don't enjoy being around.

Jonathan's behavior aside, Arsenic and Old Lace is a riot, a comedy full of charm and wit that, like a fine wine or a classic car, only gets better with age.







You are subscribed to email updates from 2,500 Movies Challenge
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google Inc., 20 West Kinzie, Chicago IL USA 60610

Sunday, September 14, 2014

It Happened One Night. (immaculate conception)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "2,500 Movies Challenge" <noreply@blogger.com>
Date: Sep 14, 2014 4:29 PM
Subject: Dave's 2,500 Movies Challenge
To: <trrytrvrs@gmail.com>

Dave's 2,500 Movies Challenge


#1,489. It Happened One Night (1934)

Posted: 14 Sep 2014 03:51 AM PDT


Directed By: Frank Capra

Starring: Clark Gable, Claudette Colbert, Walter Connolly


Tag line: "Two great lovers of the screen in the grandest of romantic comedies"

Trivia: Clark Gable gave his Oscar for It Happened One Night (1934) to a child who admired it, telling him it was the winning of the statue that had mattered, not owning it. The child returned the Oscar to the Gable family after Clark's death






A few days ago, I was watching a video interview with Frank Capra Jr., during which he discussed his father's 1934 film, It Happened One Night. According to Capra Jr, leading lady Claudette Colbert was less than enthusiastic about the movie, and even told her friends that she thought it was the worst picture she'd ever made. Obviously, the Academy disagreed with her. Not only did It Happened One Night capture the Oscar for Best Picture, but it also won awards for its director (Capra), lead actor (Clark Gable), writer (Robert Riskin), and, yes, Ms. Colbert, who took home the Oscar as that year's Best Actress. In fact, It Happened One Night was the first movie to win all five of the Academy's top honors, a feat that wasn't duplicated until 40+ years later (by 1975's One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest). Watching it today, I can see why voters fell in love with it; It Happened One Night is a charmingly whimsical romance.

As the story begins, wealthy heiress Ellie Andrews (Colbert) is being held captive aboard a yacht by her father (Walter Connolly), who objects to her recent marriage to famous aviator Westley (Jameson Thomas), and is doing everything he can to keep the newlyweds apart. Determined to see her betrothed, Ellie escapes and heads to the nearest bus station, hopping aboard one bound for New York. It's here that she meets Peter Warne (Gable), a no-nonsense reporter who, in a drunken stupor, just quit his job with a big city newspaper. Hoping he can still get it back, Peter agrees to accompany Ellie on her journey in exchange for an exclusive on her story. But as their trip drags on, these two traveling companions, who have nothing in common, begin to fall in love with each other.

If Claudette Colbert did indeed have doubts about It Happened One Night, she didn't let them affect her performance. Her character's transition from naïve rich girl to love-struck young woman comes across as 100% genuine, and Colbert (who, despite the fact she wears the same outfit through much of the movie, looks radiant) is the reason why. Her co-star, Clark Gable, also shines, playing Peter as a thick-skinned newspaperman who knows how the world works. It's his fast-thinking that keeps them a step ahead of the detectives hired to find Ellie, and some of his streetwise wisdom even manages to rub off on his pretty companion. In one of the film's most famous scenes, Peter is teaching Ellie the art of hitching a ride, yet fails to wave a single car down. So, Ellie gives it a try, but instead of holding out her thumb, she lifts her skirt and shows a little leg, at which point a car screeches to a halt.

As for Capra, he injects enough warmth and humanity into these characters to turn what might have been a predictable story into something much more appealing. My favorite scene takes place on the bus, and has Peter and Ellie (as well as the other passengers) being entertained by a small musical group, which, to pass the time, is belting out an impromptu version of "The Flying Trapeze". Eventually, other passengers join in, each singing a different verse. It's a boisterous bit of fun, but just as the scene draws to a close, Capra tosses some drama into the mix by introducing a young boy who starts to cry when his mother passes out. Peter, who rushes over to help, learns that neither the boy nor his mother have eaten anything in days (they spent all their money on bus fare). This subtle combination of frivolity and pathos would become a Capra trademark, with many of his best films tickling our funny bones while they also tug at our heartstrings.

Along with its sweep of the Academy Awards, the National Board of Review selected It Happened One Night as the best movie of 1934, and it continues to wow audiences even today (in 2006, the Online Film & Television Society voted it into its Hall of Fame, an honor it shared with Nashville, Rashomon, The Rules of the Game and The Third Man). A smart comedy with plenty of heart, It Happened One Night deserved every award it won.







You are subscribed to email updates from 2,500 Movies Challenge
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google Inc., 20 West Kinzie, Chicago IL USA 60610

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

32 Great Unscripted Movie Scenes

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "StumbleUpon" <no-reply@mail.stumblemail.net>
Date: Sep 9, 2014 4:03 AM
Subject: The 32 Greatest Unscripted Movie Scenes
To: <trrytrvrs@gmail.com>

 
Can't see this email? View it online.  
 
 
StumbleUpon   StumbleUpon
 
Updated Lists   Trending Pages   Expert Likes
 
 
 
The Best of the Week
 
 
 
 
Top Stumble
 
The 32 Greatest Unscripted Movie Scenes
 
Movies | 1404676 Views
 
View Page
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
RainyMood.com: Rain makes everything better.
 
Music
 
384466 Views
 
View Page
 
 
 
Watch Jack White Perform Two Acoustic Tracks at French Chateau
 
Classic Rock
 
1664 Views
 
View Page
 
 
 
 
 
Remove The Lyrics From MOST Songs
 
Music
 
2110272 Views
 
View Page
 
 
 
The Nostalgia Machine
 
Music
 
393554 Views
 
View Page
 
 
 
 
 
 
Stumbling On-The-Go?
 
Download on the App Store   ANDROID AP ON Google play
 
 
 
 
LET'S BE FRIENDS
 
f   tw   g+   in
 
StumbleUpon | 301 Brannan St., 6th Floor, San Francisco, CA 94107
 
Questions? Try our Help Center. Don't want to receive emails of this type? Click here.