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Friday, August 29, 2014

Reviews at RogerEbert.com for the week of August 29, 2014

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From: "Ebert Digital" <newsletter@ebertdigital.com>
Date: Aug 29, 2014 11:06 AM
Subject: New Reviews at RogerEbert.com for the week of August 29, 2014
To: <trrytrvrs@gmail.com>

This is your weekly update of new reviews on RogerEbert.com, the world's preeminent destination for movie criticism, commentary and community.

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New Reviews at RogerEbert.com for the week of August 29, 2014

Here are reviews of this week's newest movies from RogerEbert.com. For these and more, including blog posts on everything from sci-fi and low-brow comedy to forgotten masterpieces of cinema, please visit our site and join the conversation.

Life of Crime Poster

Life of Crime

Review by Glenn Kenny

While it doesn't hit the highs of the very best movies based on Elmore Leonard's works, it's also far less slick and ingratiating than the watchable but very Hollywood-processed likes of "Be Cool."

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Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People Poster

Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People

Review by Godfrey Cheshire

In telling this story and exploring its meanings, Harris' well-crafted film uses interviews with a number of historians and black photographers. But its greatest asset is the trove of photographs it marshals.

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Starred Up Poster

Starred Up

Review by Brian Tallerico

We've seen many visually arresting films in recent years and character studies are as common as film festivals, but it's the remarkable blend of the two here that makes "Starred Up" devastating.

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The Congress Poster

The Congress

Review by Scout Tafoya

"The Congress" is a roll call of the orgiastic pleasures and bountiful comforts that art provides, and, a reminder of what waits for us when we leave the theater.

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The Calling Poster

The Calling

Review by Brian Tallerico

Colorful elements of "Fargo" and "Seven" blend into a bland beige in the mostly straight-to-video "The Calling," a piece that almost miraculously finds a way to waste the prodigious talents of Susan Sarandon, Ellen Burstyn, and Donald Sutherland.

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Jamie Marks Is Dead Poster

Jamie Marks Is Dead

Review by Susan Wloszczyna

With its eerie rendering of wintry landscapes in rural Upstate New York, this supernatural ghost story about a deceased high-school misfit who haunts a fellow student settles into a near-constant shivery clamminess that goes a long way to masquerade how…

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The Notebook Poster

The Notebook

Review by Godfrey Cheshire

János Szász's "The Notebook" is a well-crafted but otherwise undistinguished and tedious entry in a long line of European films that make a grotesque show of war's horrors, often viewed through the lens of childhood's disabused innocence.

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The Strange Color of Your Body's Tears Poster

The Strange Color of Your Body's Tears

Review by Simon Abrams

"The Strange Color of Your Body's Tears" is a movie you really should see and judge for yourself since so much of its charms are visceral. It's a pleasure to behold because it doesn't try to be anything more than…

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Patema Inverted Poster

Patema Inverted

Review by Brian Tallerico

Yasuhiro Yoshiura's "Patema Inverted" mines a lot of entertainment value and social allegory from a pretty great concept despite being held back from greatness by a clunky narrative.

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Last Weekend Poster

Last Weekend

Review by Peter Sobczynski

Seemingly made for film festivals that you have never heard of and cable stations you don't recall ordering, "Last Weekend" has exactly two assets that rescue it from complete uselessness.

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The November Man Poster

The November Man

Review by Matt Zoller Seitz

In this excitingly nasty but ultimately confused action picture, Pierce Brosnan plays a retired government hitman drawn out of retirement to untangle a global political crisis as only he can.

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That Man from Rio Poster

That Man from Rio

Review by Matt Zoller Seitz

Jean-Paul Belmondo and Françoise Dorléac star in this sprightly adventure about a man trying to rescue his kidnapped fiancée.

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To Be Takei Poster

To Be Takei

Review by Odie Henderson

"To Be Takei" is a conventional documentary that has a surprising emotional heft. A fun, informative exploration of the life of actor, activist and Trekkie favorite, George Takei.

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